Acupuncture & Holistic Health Associates

People often use “raw” diets and assume it is very good for their body, sometimes ignoring the signs that their body is having trouble with a completely “raw” diet.

Not to be controversial, but the question is not “should a person eat raw foods or not?”; rather, the question is “is the individual person’s metabolism strong enough so that they could eat raw foods, break those foods down and get the nutrients?” and if so, “when (what time of the year) should a person eat raw foods?”

Our clinical experience shows us people may eat raw foods and think things are great, but have bloating that they attribute to detoxification, when in actual fact those symptoms are coming from a lack of breaking down foods that are raw.

Basically, raw foods, like everything, could be consumed in moderation for best health results, especially in winter when a person’s metabolism is weaker. Summertime is the best time to eat raw foods in higher quantity.

There are a small number of Americans in our experience who can fully metabolize large volumes of daily raw foods without any troubles, and those individuals have an extraordinarily high, hot–burning metabolism for sure.

To learn a bit more so that you can decide what would really be best for you, read our newsletter here: Raw Vs. Cooked Foods


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